Introducing 200 years of the Sovereign. Part I: Back to the very beginning…

gold sovereign group

The St. George and the Dragon Sovereigns designed by Benedetto Pistrucci

2017 marks the Bicentenary of the Modern Sovereign. Reinstated as part of the 1816 Great Recoinage to replace the Guinea, the ‘modern’ Gold Sovereign has epitomised British quality across the world for the last 200 years.

But there is much more to discover about the Gold Sovereign. And now, in the lead up to its special anniversary, we explore its story in a six part series of posts about its 200 years of fascinating history, telling the tale of the King of Coins from its very beginning in 1489 to now.

First, back to the very beginning…

The history of the Sovereign dates back as far as 1489, when King Henry VII instructed The Royal Mint to strike a new gold coin.

henry vii

Henry VII

The new coin weighed twice as much as the existing Ryal and it was the first coin to be issued with a value of one pound sterling. It was struck in almost pure gold using the standard gold coinage alloy of 23 carat.

A Design with International Power

The coin was fittingly called the Sovereign, which was also the name of his warship that had been built the year before. Its design was inspired by a coin issued in the Netherlands by Emperor Maximilian in 1487 and featured King Henry on his throne, with orb and sceptre in his hands radiating the power of the monarchy.

original sovereign coin design

An etching of the original Sovereign from 1489

The Latin inscription on the coin read ‘Henry, by the Grace of God, King of England and France, Lord of Ireland’, which sent a message to Europe that England was a nation to be reckoned with. The reverse design featured a shield bearing the Royal Arms on a large Tudor Rose.

The Sovereign became the flagship coin of the Tudor reign and was struck in turn by each Tudor monarch and is still considered the flagship coin of the Royal Mint today.

The Forgotten Years

However, the production of the Sovereign stopped when King James I inherited the throne and introduced a new pound coin, the Unite (named to mark his desire to unite England and Scotland).

And the Sovereign was forgotten for nearly 213 years, until 1816, when something momentous in the history of British coinage was to happen…

Find out what happened in Part II of our 200 years of the Sovereign Blog Series – click here to read it >>


Announcing the new UK Bicentenary Gold Proof Sovereign

To mark the Bicentenary of the “modern” Gold Sovereign in 2017, The Royal Mint have just released a brand new Gold Proof Sovereign reprising Benedetto Pistrucci’s original engraving from 1817.

the uk bicentenary gold proof sovereign

The UK Bicentenary Gold Proof Sovereign

With a low edition limit of just 10,500 worldwide, a special one-year-only design change and a fine proof finish, the 2017 Bicentenary Gold Sovereign has all the elements to be one of the most collectable British gold coins of the 21st century. And now you can own one.

Click here to secure yours today >>

 

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2 Responses to Introducing 200 years of the Sovereign. Part I: Back to the very beginning…

  1. Pauline Shepherd says:

    I tried to make sure I got my part 1 sovereign. Bit my Internet played up when I was trying to make sure I would receive a part 1 sovereign.
    I don’t have much Internet to use on my phone and I do get shut down in the middle of a bid or purchase.
    Can you only if you can please TEXT me on any updates. I am also interested in the 2 pee and 1 pee both British. I was looking at review about a book about old British coins. Can you please help me find the book please.
    Thank you Pauline Shepherd

    Like

  2. David Smith says:

    Sounds good…

    Like

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